New report: How Canada fairs in adoption of renewables

According to a new report released by the country’s National Energy Board (NEB), Canada generates a larger share of its electricity from renewable sources than most other developed economies in the world.

The report also notes that every Canadian province and territory (except Nunavut) generated at least some power from wind energy in 2015.

The report, titled Canada’s Adoption of Renewable Power Sources, provides direct comparisons of how Canada ranks internationally for renewable power adoption. It also covers factors that affect the uptake of each renewable source, including financial costs, reliability, and environmental impacts.

While most of the country’s renewables are generated from hydro production, the report also notes that every Canadian province and territory (except Nunavut) generated at least some power from wind energy in 2015. It adds that from 2010-2015, the country’s installed wind-power capacity increased by 24% each year.

As of the end of 2016, Canada had more than 11,898 MW of installed wind-generation capacity, and expects to add another 7oo MW this year. According to the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA), as of the end of 2016 there are 285 wind farms made up of 6,288 wind turbines operating across the country.

Canada’s electricity generation per capita is relatively high, stated the NEB report. With more than 600 terawatt hours (TW.h) of electricity production in 2015, Canada generates as much electricity as countries with much larger populations, including Germany, Brazil, and France. One terawatt hour is enough to provide 80,000 homes with electricity for a year.

The low-carbon emissions associated with renewables have also aligned them with current policy priorities. As a result, the increased adoption of renewables is expected to continue in Canada and internationally.

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